Scotland is seeing unseasonably warm weather right now, as temperatures reach the mid-20s and the sun shines all day.

It has been a scorcher so far this week in Scotland, and on Monday Glasgow recorded 15.5 hours of sunshine – meaning it was the sunniest place in the whole of the UK.

Those in the north of the country are experiencing even better conditions than people in the South, but why is this?

How hot has it been in Scotland?

The Met Office said May has been “very dry” and with “just slightly more than half the normal amount of rainfall we would actually expect”.

Scotland recorded its highest temperatures of the year so far on Tuesday at 24.5 in Tyndrum, Stirling.

The Scottish Environment Protection Agency (Sepa) even issued its first alert level warning of the year. After very low river flows around Loch Maree in Wester Ross they warned about water scarcity.

It urged businesses including distilleries, farms and golf courses to reduce the volume of water they use.

A wildfire also flared up in Cannich, south of Inverness, last week and continued to burn over the weekend.

There are upsides of course, and experts say it will help bring tourism back after the lull during Covid.

Rob Dickson from Visit Scotland said: “Without a doubt great weather is a great opportunity to get out and see Scotland.

“I think we are bouncing back. The consumer research gives us cause for cautious optimism that there is continued interest for domestic and international visitors.

“There are really strong indicators that we are bouncing back and that our businesses can look forward to a good summer.”

What is the weather forecast?

Grahame Madge, Met Office spokesman, says: “Scotland will be among some of the warmest places in the UK in the next few days, with highs up to 24°C and 25°C. 

“The reason for the largely fine and settled conditions is the fact we have got an extensive area of high pressure north-west of Scotland and that is driving the conditions we have. The nearer you get to the centre of high pressure, the better the conditions will be.

“If you look at Scotland over next few days we have a contrast across Scotland and a contrast with rest of the UK.

“We are expecting higher temperatures to be west of Scotland near Oban, but on the east it is a different picture. If you’re in Aberdeen or Caithness or the northern isles, anywhere with exposure to the North Sea, you’re going to find things different.

“As the area of high pressure is over the North West, the air around it is moving and going in over the North Sea, hence more cloud and cooler temperatures. Across Scotland there could be as much as a 12-degree difference.

“If we look at Friday we can see that temperatures in Glasgow could be around 20°C, Aberdeen around 14°C, and that disparity is likely to be maintained. We have got temperatures in Glasgow of 22°C on Saturday and possibly even 23°C on Sunday and Monday, but 16C or lower in Aberdeen and east coast locations.

“In terms of rainfall, there won’t be much anywhere in the UK, high pressure tends to suppress rainfall.”

When will it end?

Temperatures will go down a little at the end of the week, but it will still be sunny and warm, and the Met Office says they can see the high pressure system sticking around for another eight or nine days.

Mr Madge continued: “From what we can see at the moment this is likely to stick around for the first week of June, but there are question marks beyond the eighth, thats too far out to have significant confidence.

“It will eventually break down but it looks set for next eight or nine days. We could see temperatures keep climbing.

“With the outlook for June, we can always expect periods of fine and settled conditions, but theres low confidence just now.

“The high pressure area will eventually breakdown at the moment and that’s looking into the second week of June. It is inevitable that it will break down and allow more rain into the forecast.”

What is the national Met Office forecast?

Today:

Mostly dry, although rather cloudy for many at first. Cloud gradually breaking and becoming confined towards the far north and east of Scotland, along with some central and eastern parts of England. Otherwise warm sunshine developing. Breezy in the south.

Tonight:

Staying largely dry. Some late sunshine for many, with clear spells and local fog patches developing in the west overnight. Elsewhere low cloud becoming extensive from the east and northeast.

Thursday:

Early cloud retreating towards the north and east, and here staying cool. Elsewhere plenty of warm sunshine developing as the cloud breaks quite readily. Remaining rather breezy in the south.

Outlook for Friday to Sunday:

High pressure will dominate giving mainly fine and settled weather. Warm sunshine for many, although low cloud persisting across parts of the north and east, becoming more widespread temporarily overnight.

By admin